Distance Learning improving traditional classroom instruction

I thought this article from Inside Higher Ed was particularly good at showing some of the positive gains from teaching distance learning. Many distance learning faculty have experienced it – and have shared how teaching distance learning has made them better classroom-based instructors. As we move in the direction of expanding the use of Blackboard for classroom teaching (as well as e-learning courses), the discussion seems quite timely. What has been your experience?

Learning From Online

December 7, 2009

Most professors agree that more work goes into designing an online course than a face-to-face one. But if those professors are interested in improving their teaching skills, it might be worth the extra effort.

So say researchers at Purdue University at Calumet, who believe that learning how to do distance education properly can make professors better at designing and administering their classroom-based courses.

“Most of the professors who teach at the university level have had no experience with pedagogy or instruction in general,” says Janet Buckenmeyer, chair of the instructional technology master’s program at Calumet. “They’re content experts, not teaching experts.”

Since most professors have spent their lives holding forth from the front of a lecture hall, many have not had to engineer their lesson plans with the sort of rigor required of a well-designed online course, Buckenmeyer says.

When teaching online, she says, “You have to pay more attention to the navigation of the course, the clarity of the course, the objectives of the course, the reason why you’re assigning activities and assessments, [and make] certain everything is perfectly clear to the students. In a face-to-face situation, you can get by with just coming in and not having prepared and winging a class session. You can’t do that online.”

Or rather, you can’t do that online if you expect students to learn well. “You can develop a really bad online course,” says Buckenmeyer, without necessarily knowing it. In order to teach well online, she says, professors need guidance.

Full article available at http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/12/07/online

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